Month: June 2013

Strawberry Hibiscus Champagne Jam

Okay, I’ll admit it. I’ve become a little jam obsessed. Strawberry season hit and I was getting all these delicious berries from our CSA (thank you Cider Hill Farms!). Eventually, I thought… why not make strawberry jam? And because we definitely can’t do anything the standard way, we thought… why not add hibiscus and champagne?

It’s worth mentioning that this recipe came out PERFECTLY. The champagne and hibiscus added the perfect amount of flavor to complement the strawberries. Too much sweet can sometimes make you dizzy and achieve satiety a way too fast. The slightly sour and sweet taste of ripe strawberries is perfectly complemented by the unconventional and princely flavors of hibiscus and champagne. The additional ingredients are added just at the minimum right amount so that you can really make out what is joining the other like the bitcoin and robot in cryptocurrency trading.

Strawberry Hibiscus Champagne Jam
Excerpted and modified from 
Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy


Classics are often classics for a reason, and this strawberry jam is a great example—when you’re working with perfectly ripe, in-season fruit, you don’t have to add much to make a spectacular jam. Use locally grown berries if you can, as their flavor and color will be richer and more vibrant than the grocery store variety. This is an excellent recipe to start with if you’re new to jam making. For something different, try it warmed on top of pancakes—delicious!


KF: Becky and I modified this recipe from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin to incorporate hibiscus and champagne. Feel free to change it up to make it yours.


Before You Begin:

 

Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine 1/2 teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with 1/2 cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

 

2 1/4 pounds (1 kg) strawberries
1/2 cup (75 g) dried hibiscus flowers
1/2 cup (120 ml) champagne

2 teaspoons calcium water

1 cup (200 g) sugar

2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1,000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

  1. Soak hibiscus flowers in champagne for an hour. Drain out the flowers and keep the liquid to add to the mashed strawberries.
  1. Rinse strawberries, remove stems, and mash in a large bowl.

 

  1. Measure 4 cups (946 ml) of mashed strawberries (saving any extra for another use), and combine the measured quantity in a saucepan with calcium water and Champagne-soaked hibiscus. Mix well.

 

  1. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

 

  1. Bring strawberry/hibiscus/Champagne mixture to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.
  1. Can your Jam: Remove jars from canner and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch (6 mm) of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches (2.5 to 5 cm) of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes (adjusting for altitude if necessary). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

 

Yield: 4 to 5 half-pint (8-ounce, or 236 ml) jars

If you’ve ever made jam or jelly at home, you know most recipes require more sugar than fruit—oftentimes 4 to 7 cups!—causing many people to look for other ways to preserve more naturally and with less sugar. Pomona’s Pectin is the answer to this canning conundrum. Unlike other popular pectins, which are activated by sugar, Pomona’s is a sugar- and preservative-free citrus pectin that does not require sugar to jell. As a result, jams and jellies can be made with less, little, or no sugar at all and also require much less cooking time than traditional recipes, allowing you to create jams that are not only healthier and quicker to make, but filled with more fresh flavor! If you haven’t tried Pomona’s already (prepare to be smitten!), you can easily find the pectin at your local natural foods store, Williams-Sonoma, or online.

In this first official Pomona’s Pectin cookbook, you’ll learn how to use this revolutionary product and method to create marmalades, preserves, conserves, jams, jellies, and more. You’ll find endless combinations sure to delight all year round!

How to Make Chocolate Hazelnut Butter

This past weekend, Becky and I decided to have a breakfast day and try out a few new recipes, including this one for Chocolate Hazelnut Butter. I’m a giant fan of NUTELLA, so I thought attempting to make my own would be super fun. I was right, it really was.

Erin Coopey’s recipe is easy to follow, doesn’t cost much to make, and ends up perfect. If you want to know more about what makes Erin so fabulous read my interview with Erin Coopey here.

Chocolate Hazelnut Butter
Excerpted from The Kitchen Pantry Cookbook by Erin Coopey

Make your own chocolate hazelnut butter

This creamy chocolate blend can double as an ice cream topping if you don’t have any toast!Besides, when your little one becomes fuzzy with eating toasts or bread, you can please him with this experimental delicacy. It saves your time, effort and mood-consuming foodie fight with your naughty nut. This one also serves right when your health is not in its good terms and your taste buds are longing to feel something. When you are on the move, one quick preparation straight from the source saves a meal.

To make Chocolate Pecan Butter, substitute 1 1/3 cups (145 g) toasted pecan halves for the hazelnuts.

Yield: About 2 cups (520 g)

Ingredients
1 cup (175 g) semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup (120 ml) milk
1/2 cup (60 g) powdered milk
1 rounded tablespoon (20 g) honey
Pinch of sea salt or kosher salt
1/3 cup (48 g) blanched almonds
2/3 cup (90 g) toasted hazelnuts, skins removed (see Note)

Directions
Place the chocolate chips in a small mixing bowl and set aside.

In a small saucepan, combine the milk, powdered milk, honey, and salt. Heat over medium heat until the milk just reaches a boil. Remove from the heat and immediately pour over the chocolate chips. Do not stir. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the milk and chocolate rest for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, place the nuts in a food processor and grind until they are a fine paste. This may take 5 minutes or more of continuous grinding. Stop grinding from time to time to scrape down the sides of the food processor to ensure the nuts are grinding evenly.

Remove the plastic wrap from the mixing bowl and whisk the milk mixture until the chocolate is thoroughly blended. Now, begin to stream in the chocolate milk mixture. Continue to process until all the milk has been added. Blend until everything is well combined and takes on a glossy finish.

If you’d prefer a smoother texture, pour the mixture into a food mill with a medium disk or through a fine-mesh sieve to remove any unground bits of toasted nuts. Transfer to a jar and refrigerate. Use within 1 week.

Note: Toasted hazelnuts are often sold with the skins intact. If the hazelnuts you purchase have the skins on them, simply wrap them in a clean kitchen towel and rub vigorously. They don’t need to be perfectly clean; just try to slough off as much of the skin as possible.

 

 

 

If you purchase raw hazelnuts, place the nuts on a sheet pan and roast in a 350ºF (180ºC, or gas mark 4) oven for 15 minutes. Let cool and rub.

Learn how to make your own pantry staples with this essential handbook, including the condiments, nut butters, salad dressings, stocks, relishes, and dips you like to keep in stock. Homemade foods from scratch always taste better; just try a spoonful of creamy, eggy, from-scratch mayonnaise, and you’ll swear off the salty bland commercial stuff for good! The Kitchen Pantry Cookbook shows you how to make your own foods to have on hand for your favorite meals. Avoid the high fructose corn syrup, the extra salt, the trans fats, the modified food starch, and the unpronounceable preservatives, and tailor the recipes to avoid the ingredients your family is allergic to. Each recipe features easy substitutions whenever possible, as well as the best way to store the finished product.

Erin Coopey is a chef, writer, and food photographer in Seattle, WA. After receiving her culinary degree in Scottsdale, Erin trained at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone. Erin’s recipes have appeared in numerous publications, and she has appeared on several television programs to demonstrate recipes and products. She teaches at South Seattle Community College, PCC Natural Markets, Chefshop.com, Parties That Cook, and privately through Glorified HomeChef.

Buy this book at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, through the Indiebound network, Indigo Canada, or at a retailer near you.

Raw Week: Judita’s Hazelnut Fig Shake and Sunny Peach Salad

I’m a diehard hazelnut lover; take my Pinterest Nutella board as a classic example. Although sometimes hazelnuts don’t have to be with chocolate to be fabulous, and this recipe is a perfect example. If you had enough of chocolate for your mind and stomach, then it is time for a change. And this one cools down your mind and fills your stomach with the goodness of nuts and fig. The lovely appearance just adds to its wonderful flavor in the summer or to get some respite from the addictive crypto trading. And don’t just get caught up in the shake (it’s easy to do, believe me…). Judita also shared her recipe for Sunny Peach Salad and it’s sure to knock your socks off.

Be sure to check out my interview with Raw Chef, Judita Wignall by clicking here.

Hazelnut Fig Shake
Excerpted from Raw & Simple by Judita Wignall

Raw Hazelnut Fig Shake

This fantastically delicious smoothie was inspired by one offered at my favorite LA raw eatery, Café Gratitude.

Makes 2 servings.
Plan ahead: Freeze 1 1/2 cups (225 g) banana chunks.
Prep time: 10 minutes

2 cups (235ml) water
½ cup (88g) hazelnuts
6 small dried figs
1½ cups (225g) frozen banana chunks
½ vanilla bean, scraped
Dash sea salt

Put water and hazelnuts in a blender until the nuts are broken down. Strain the liquid through a nut milk bag, and then return hazelnut milk to the blender and add the remaining ingredients. Blend until smooth and serve immediately.

Sunny Peach Salad with Chipotle-Maple Dressing
Excerpted from Raw & Simple by Judita Wignall

Spicy sweet vinaigrette over ripe summer peaches makes a great combo in this beautiful and effortless salad.

Makes 4-6 servings.
Prep time: 15 minutes

Dressing:
3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil
3 tablespoons (45 ml) balsamic vinegar
1 ½ tablespoons (25 ml) maple syrup
¼ teaspoon chipotle chile powder
¼ teaspoon sea salt

Whisk together ingredients in a small bowl.

Salad:
6 cups (360 g) spring or mesclun mix
4 peaches, pitted and sliced
½ cup (58 g) chopped pecans
¼ cup (40 g) thinly sliced shallot

Toss all ingredients in a large bowl and serve with dressing on the side. This salad will keep for a day or two in the refrigerator.

Making smart, delicious food choices in a short amount of time is now easier than ever. Raw and Simple provides easy (and incredibly tasty!) recipes that will feed your body and spirit without requiring hours of prep work.

Raw food chef and instructor Judita Wignall fully integrates her raw food platform with holistic health and wellness. It’s not just about food—it’s about feeding your whole body and fueling your life!

Summer Cocktail Sunday: Premiere of True Blood Season 6

Welcome, Truebies!

It’s Becky, again, and I am taking over SPOON Sundays this summer to bring you some awesome posts focused on True Blood themed cocktails!

Here is an awesome news from the trading market; the opening slots per day for those who had limited their entry into them have now been a little relaxed. The trading robots have decided to expand their width a little to accommodate more interested traders. So hurry up and grab this opportunity for making more.

First, let’s take a moment to welcome back all of our favorite characters and remember how we left that crazy town of Bon Temps.

Caution: Beware of Spoilers.

Season 5 Recap

-End Spoilers-

So, I’d say we start Season 6 on a pretty interesting note. This calls for a drink.

I decided that I had to choose a cocktail from a book that could take me back to a time when I imagine vampires whooping it up. I imagine Bill and Eric hanging out, before they got into this whole Sookie-rivalry thing. I imagine that they met up in the 20’s and went to see Rudolph Valentino’s movie Blood and Sand. I imagine that they grab a drink afterward, probably from a ticket taker’s neck.

Lucky for me, Ted Haigh include’s a cocktail named for this film:

We are going to feel totally classy drinking this vintage libation, let me tell you.

1 oz Scotch
1 oz orange juice
3/4 oz cherry brandy
3/4 oz sweet vermouth

Shake in an iced cocktail shaker, and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a cocktail cherry. It was so easy to make!

I am totally ready to do bad things.

Beginning June 16th, True Blood is on HBO on Sundays at 9:00pm EST. Tune in next Sunday when I create another TB-themed cocktail!

ABOUT THIS BOOK

Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails

From the Alamagoozlum to the Zombie 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them

In this expanded and updated edition of Forgotten Cocktails and Vintage Spirits, historian, expert, and drink aficionado Dr. Cocktail adds another 20 fine recipes to his hand-picked collection of 80 rare-and-worth-rediscovered drink recipes, shares revelations about the latest cocktail trends, provides new resources for uncommon ingredients, and profiles of many of the cocktail world’s movers and shakers. Historic facts, expanded anecdotes, and full-color vintage images from extremely uncommon sources round out this must-have volume. For anyone who enjoys an icy drink and an unforgettable tale.

Father’s Day Recipes: Pizza Calzone

For all of the camping dads out there, Cook Wild is the perfect book. This book is split up by season and features a ton of camping recipes from breads to desserts to pizza and more. Here’s one of my favorites from the book that is sure to be a popular choices for all kinds of dads. After all, who doesn’t love a great calzone?

Pizzas are all-time favorites among the doting dads when they are forced to enter the kitchen and also when they volunteer to help out their dearest partners. The twist added here eliminates the forceful part from cooking. Now, every father would be waiting to take out their family and let them have a taste of his Calzone Pizza. Learn even more here about cooking Pizzas outdoors than you ever thought you could.

Don’t love camping? No problem. Try out this recipe on the grill in your own backyard.

Pizza Calzones
Excerpted from Cook Wild: Year Round Cooking on an Open Flame by Susanne Fischer-Rizzi

 

Pizza Calzones from Cook Wild

Calzone pizza pockets are ideal for a celebration or a party outdoors. Simply arrange the various ingredients on leaves as a buffet, so that each guest can create their own filling. I often make calzone pizza on my wildlife courses, and it is always a success and tastes delicious.

For 5-7 pizzas

1 packet natural dry yeast (from a health food shop) or 1/2 cube fresh yeast
500 g (1 lb) 3 3/4 cups flour
salt
2 tbsp. of olive oil
about 200 ml (6 3/4 fl oz) 3/4 cup water

Filling ingredients:

1-2 mozzarella balls or finely dried cheese
3 tomatoes, sliced
tinned tuna
salami, sliced
ham, sliced
pepperoni
herbs, e.g. basil, thyme, oregano (wild herbs are also good)
salt

Mix the dry yeast and the flour well; or completely dissolve the fresh yeast in some warm water or warm milk, and then add the flour. Add the salt, olive oil and water and knead into a smooth pizza dough. If the dough is too soft it may ooze through the grill. Form the dough into a ball, dust it with flour, and leave to rest close to the fire for 1 hour in a bowl covered with a kitchen towel, until its volume has doubled.

Divide the dough into peach-sized balls and press flat. Put the desired filling ingredients on one half. Fold the other half over to form a half moon and press together thoroughly rounding the edges.

Place the filled pockets on the grill and bake above the embers for about 15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the dough. The calzone pizzas are done when you tap them and they sound slightly hollow. They can also be baked on a hot flat stone, clay oven or Dutch oven.

Tip:
Instead of the tomato slices, you can spread tomato puree or strained tomatoes on the dough before putting on the other ingredients.

Cooking utensils:
A bowl; a grill with as little space possible between the bars or a flat stone.

Fire
A fire with a lot of mature embers and few flames.

Wild plant information
You can also fill the pizza pockets with wild herbs mixed with ricotta, quark, or crème fraiche. Fresh thyme and wild marjoram give both variations an Italian flair. You can also season them with salt and pepper and perhaps nutmeg.

Pick up your copy of Cook Wild today. It makes a GREAT Father’s Day gift.

Everything tastes better in the open air, around a fire. Here are 100 recipes to inspire you to venture outdoors and eat wild all year round. From the simple dishes that sustained our ancestors to feasts fit for modern foodies, the book draws from a rich repertoire of traditional cooking methods and recipes that have been passed down to this day. Whether it’s Lebanese flatbread, hot smoked trout, chicken wrapped in clay, or waffles, chocolate bananas and Transylvanian tree cakes, all are simple and don’t need special tools. The author has years of experience of cooking outdoors and the recipes, arranged by season, are easy to follow for both beginners and more seasoned campfire chefs.

With clear instructions on selecting wood and making a fire, a range of ovens and cooking methods and even suggestions for wild ingredients to forage, this is a book for anyone who wants to enjoy the thrill of cooking outdoors, with woodsmoke, companionship and fresh air to sharpen the appetite.

Thelma’s Pistachio Swirl Nut Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

If you are raised in a Southern household or have Southern-born parents, you know that traditionally, Sundays are for going to church then having a big dinner with family and friends. Thelma, my mom, loved Sundays because she was able to praise the Lord and then cook up a storm!

As a kid, Sunday was my favorite day because I got to hang out with my cousins and eat really good food. I also loved that my mom would make one of her fantastic desserts for us.

Apart from this I also loved sitting with my dad when he trades for I was his lucky charm and this way even I learnt a lot about trade. It just looked like some sort of game those days but now I realise how beneficial this is to me. See this site to know more about how this fascinated me.

Our choices were as follows: apple pie, sweet potato pie, or chocolate cake. For special occasions or if new friends were coming over for dinner, Thelma would bless us with my all-time favorite dessert, a Pistachio Swirl Nut Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting!

There is nothing like a pistachio cake, and when you add the cream cheese frosting, it’s like winning the confection lottery. A cake delicacy, the Pistachio Swirl Nut Cake is moist, sweet, smooth, and sinfully delicious!

This past weekend, I decided to make my mom’s Pistachio Swirl Nut Cake. Not only did I have to say a little prayer so I wouldn’t consume the entire cake in one sitting, it also brought back wonderful memories of spending time with family and friends. To me, food and family are the two best things on earth!

Making Thelma’s Pistachio Swirl Nut Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

Cake Ingredients:
1 box yellow cake mix
1 package pistachio instant pudding mix
4 eggs
½ teaspoon almond extract
1 cup (240 g) sour cream
½ cup (100 g) sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup (75 g) chopped roasted pecans (or unsalted pistachios)
1 bundt cake pan
1 large mixing bowl
1 medium-sized mixing bowl

Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients:
8 oz. (230 g) package cream cheese
1 stick of margarine
1 lb. (450 g) box confectionery sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 medium-sized mixing bowl

Cake Directions:
1) Grease and lightly flour the bottom of the bundt cake pan, then place aside.

2) Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F (177 degrees C, or gas mark 4) .

3) Combine the yellow cake mix, pistachio instant pudding, 4 eggs, 1 cup (240 g) sour cream, and ½ teaspoon almond extract in a large mixing bowl. Beat mixture on medium speed for about 2 minutes.

4) In a separate bowl, mix ½ cup (100 g) of sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, and ½ cup (75 g) finely chopped nuts using a spoon or spatula—make sure to mix thoroughly.

5) Pour half of the cake batter into the greased and floured bundt cake pan and then evenly sprinkle the nut mixture on top of the cake batter.

6) Top the nut mixture with the remaining cake batter.

7) Bake for 50 minutes or until the center of the cake springs bake when lightly touched.

8) When completely baked, let cake cool for 15 minutes before removing it from the pan.

9) Let cake set out for several hours to cool. The cake should be completely cool before applying frosting. I recommend placing the cake on a cake platter, covering it with a dome, and letting it sit overnight.


Cream Cheese Frosting Directions:

10) In a mixing bowl, combine the stick of margarine, cream cheese, and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Beat mixture until smooth.

11) Gradually add the entire 1 lb. (450 g) box of confectionery sugar while beating the cream cheese mixture. If the mixture becomes too thick, add a small amount of milk until the mixture becomes spreadable.

12) Carefully frost the cake to your liking and serve.

As a decorative touch that adds a nice flavor to the cake, I placed a 16 oz. (450 g) jar of shelled roasted pistachios into a zip lock bag and crushed them. Then I took the crushed pistachio mixture and spooned it around the bottom edge of the frosted cake.

A Jamtastic Giveaway and Margarita Marmalade Recipe

As many of you now know, I just got back from the Mother Earth News Fairwhere I was working at our Quayside Publishing Group booth. We had a great time meeting all sorts of amazing people who are equally focused on great food, sustainability, farming, and more.

I brought 12 delicious jars of jams, jellies, conserves, and preserves with me to the fair… all made by the one and only Allison Carroll Duffy of the new book Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin. Everyone ooed and awed over how great each was.The response was as I expected, for I knew how marvelous the natural and safe fruit preparations of Allison are. The overwhelming appreciation ignited the idea of spreading these preserves to our dearest readers of this website. All I could think of on my way back was on how to create more enthusiasm on this share.

So I thought what better way to share Allison’s amazing recipes with you all than by joining up with my friends at Craftside and the new blog Whole Home News to offer you guys this Jamtastic Giveaway.

Here’s the deal. The prize packs are the same, but you have three chances to win. One here, one at Craftside, and one at Whole Home News. The choice is yours. Enter here, enter at one of the other blogs, or enter all three for three times the fun! Good luck.

Giveaway open to residents of the continental US and Canada only. All entrants are automatically signed up for our monthly SPOON e-newsletter. 

Margarita Marmalade

Excerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy

Margarita Marmalade

With plenty of south-of-the-border flair, and a generous kick of tequila, this grown-up marmalade is just plain fun. Laced with orange peels and loaded with limes, it’s perfect on croissants or even mini cornbread loaves for a wedding shower brunch.

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine 1/2 teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with 1/2 cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Yield: 6 to 7 half-pint (8-ounce, or 236 ml) jars

Ingredients
12 medium-size limes, divided
4 medium-size oranges
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) water
3 teaspoons (15 ml) calcium water
1/2 cup (120 ml) tequila
1/2 cup (120 ml) orange liqueur
2 1/2 cups (500 g) sugar
4 1/2 teaspoons (13.5 g) Pomona’s pectin powder

Directions
Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

Slice 2 of the limes in half and squeeze out their juice, discarding the seeds and peels. Divide the juice, reserving 1/4 cup (60 ml) of the lime juice for later use. Then, set aside extra lime juice (if there is any) in a different container.

Wash the oranges. Peel oranges and remaining limes, and set aside peels from 2 of the oranges, discarding all remaining peels. Remove and discard seeds, excess white pith, or fibrous parts of the membrane from the flesh of the fruit. Chop the flesh of the fruit.

Using a paring knife, scrape off and discard the inner white part of the reserved orange peels. Slice the peels into thin strips, about 1-inch (2.5 cm) long.

In a large saucepan, combine chopped fruit, sliced peels, 1 1/2 cups (355 ml) of water, and the extra lime juice, if there is any (not including the 1/4 cup [60 ml] reserved juice). Bring mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.

Measure 5 cups (1.2 L) of the cooked fruit (saving any extra for another use), and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add calcium water, the 1/4 cup (60 ml) reserved lime juice, tequila, and orange liqueur and mix well.

In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

Bring fruit mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the marmalade returns to a boil. Once it returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

Can Your Marmalade

Remove jars from canner and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

Paring Peels

Unlike other citrus fruits, lime peels can be difficult to remove with your fingers. If you have trouble, carefully use a paring knife to slice the peel off.

Preserving Pomona's Pectin

 

If you’ve ever made jam or jelly at home, you know most recipes require more sugar than fruit—oftentimes 4 to 7 cups!—causing many people to look for other ways to preserve more naturally and with less sugar. Pomona’s Pectin is the answer to this canning conundrum. Unlike other popular pectins, which are activated by sugar, Pomona’s is a sugar- and preservative-free citrus pectin that does not require sugar to jell. As a result, jams and jellies can be made with less, little, or no sugar at all and also require much less cooking time than traditional recipes, allowing you to create jams that are not only healthier and quicker to make, but filled with more fresh flavor! If you haven’t tried Pomona’s already (prepare to be smitten!), you can easily find the pectin at your local natural foods store, Williams-Sonoma, or online.

In this first official Pomona’s Pectin cookbook, you’ll learn how to use this revolutionary product and method to create marmalades, preserves, conserves, jams, jellies, and more. You’ll find endless combinations sure to delight all year round!