Month: January 2013

Bittersweet Chocolate Pots de Creme Recipe

I’m on a dessert kick this week, so here is yet another simply scrumptious recipe that you’re going to want to make again and again.

From the various crypto software’s that are available in market crypto code is best software and will give traders payouts about 95% and this software has more than 40 assets for users to invest on and gain profits out of them, the results will be generated in very less time and will not take more than 60 seconds.

And be sure to enter the Goodreads Giveaway for your chance to take home an autographed copy of the amazing cookbook that this recipe is from, The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods by Olivia Dupin.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods by Olivia Dupin

The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods

by Olivia Dupin

Giveaway ends February 04, 2013.
See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter to win



Bittersweet Chocolate Pots de Creme
Excerpted from The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods by Olivia Dupin

Bittersweet Chocolate Pots de Creme Recipe

Pot de creme, or “pot of cream”, is simply a rich, baked custard. Traditionally, these were served in small lidded pots, but ramekins work well here. I go crazy for bananas, so I pair this with a banana whipped cream.

Ingredients

5 egg yolks
1/2 cup (50 g) sugar
1/2 vanilla bean
1 cup (235 ml) milk
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) heavy cream
4 ounces (115 g) bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped

Chef’s tip: For a dairy-free pot de creme, substitute equal parts coconut milk for the milk and cream in this recipe.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C, or gas mark 4).

In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until well combined. Set aside.

Use a paring knife to split open the length of the vanilla bean. Use the back of the knife (the dull side) to scrape the seeds out of the vanilla bean pod and into a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Add the scraped vanilla bean pod, milk, and cream to the saucepan. Place the pan over medium heat and slowly bring the mixture to a boil. Be sure to watch the pot because milk and cream will quickly boil over!

Remove the milk mixture from the heat and add the chopped chocolate. Let it sit for 1 minute to let the chocolate begin to melt, and then whisk until the chocolate is completely melted and the mixture is smooth.

Remove the chocolate mixture from the heat and stream it very slowly into the egg yolk mixture, whisking as you go to combine. Be careful not to add the hot milk too quickly or you will cook the eggs.

Pour the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into another bowl. Ladle the mixture into six 3/4-cup (180 ml) ramekins. Place the ramekins inside a large baking dish, such as a lasagna pan. Fill the baking dish with hot water about halfway up the sides of the ramekins (this is so the pots de creme cook slowly and evenly). Place the baking dish in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until the center of each custard is set, but still jiggles slightly when you jostle it.

Cool the custards to room temperature, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve (at least 2 to 3 hours, but up to 3 days).

Yield: 6 servings

The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods by Olivia Dupin

 

Whether you live gluten-free due to a wheat intolerance or digestive disorder, or because you’re simply looking to eat healthier and lose weight, The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods is your one-stop reference to going g-free naturally and effectively.

Part 1 shows you how to begin a gluten-free diet with ease, with information on everything from how to shop for naturally gluten-free ingredients—many of which you’re probably already familiar—to what to look out for at restaurants and in packaged foods, to how to stock your pantry with the best and healthiest staples. You’ll also learn the keys to following a balanced gluten-free diet, so that you can be sure you’re getting all the fiber and nutrients you need to be your healthiest.

Part 2 includes 100 delicious recipes you can make with ingredients you’d find in any supermarket—no scary, foreign-sounding fillers or other products included. From classic home-style dishes like BBQ Pulled Pork and Soft Tacos, to new favorites like Quinoa Pilaf with Roasted Root Vegetables and Chocolate Chip Meringue Cookies, you’ll find countless meals to fit your time, budget, and tastes.

With The Complete Guide to Naturally Gluten-Free Foods, going g-free has never been easier—or more delicious!

The Perfect Italian Buttercream

I made the most heavenly cranberry and white chocolate scones last night (thank you Food.com) and it got me excited to be back in the world of baking.

So delicious!

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am focused on mastering new cooking and baking techniques this year and one of the things I’ve always wanted to perfect is Italian Buttercream. If you’re a lover of icing, then this recipe is especially for you.

Let me know how yours turns out.

Italian Buttercream
by Kirsten Tibballs
Excerpted from The Pastry Chef’s Apprentice

Ingredients


Ingredient US Imperial Weight Metric Weight Volume
Sugar 1 lb., 5.15 oz. 600 grams 3 cups minus
2 tablespoons + 1 tablespoon
Water 5.29 oz. 150 grams 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons
Egg white 13.23 oz. 375 grams 11 egg whites
Unsalted butter 1 lb., 10.18 oz 743 grams 3 1/4 cups
Salt 1 gram 1/8 teaspoon
Vanilla extract .18 oz. 5 grams 1 teaspoon


Procedure

1. In a heavy-bottomed pot, stir the sugar into the water. Place the pot over medium-high heat. Place the probe of a digital thermometer in the pot.

2. While the sugar mixture cooks, begin whipping the egg whites on medium speed in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whip attachment.

The crypto code software developed was designed with sophisticated and high rated algorithm which will work without any technical issues and it has capability to scan the ongoing market changes and alterations, analyze them and generate results to users, through which traders will place trade and in automated trades will be automatically placed by the system, try this software to generate better results.

Beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks


3. Do not stir the sugar syrup while it cooks; wash the sides of the pot with a wet brush to prevent crystallization. Boil the syrup until it reaches 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). Remove the pot from the stove.

Wash down the sides of the pot to prevent sugar crystals from forming

 

Check the temperature of the sugar syrup


4. Lower the mixer speed to medium-low and pour the syrup slowly into the egg whites in between the whip and the side of the bowl.

Slowly pour the syrup into the whipped eggs


5. After all the syrup has been incorporated, resume mixing on medium speed and whip until the meringue is cool.

6. Cream the butter in a mixing bowl to soften it, or pound it with a rolling pin until it’s pliable. Add the butter gradually to the cooled meringue.

7. Add the salt and vanilla after half of the butter has been incorporated.

8. Continue whipping until all ingredients are combined and the buttercream is smooth, light, and creamy.

9. Use directly or store in the refrigerator until needed. To use refrigerated buttercream, melt a small portion over simmering water and add it to the cold buttercream in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Whip smooth.

Variations:

1. For chocolate buttercream, add 8.8 ounces (250 g) melted chocolate along with the salt and vanilla.



2. For mocha buttercream, make a paste with hot water and espresso-grind instant coffee to add to the chocolate buttercream to taste, approximately 2 ounces (57 g), along with the salt and vanilla.

Enjoy! This icing is truly delicious.




For many people, pastries, cakes, chocolates, and sweets come ready to eat right from the grocery store. If they’re lucky, a local bakery or chocolate shop satisfies the community’s sweet tooth. Few people think they have the skill or the time to tackle something as seemingly complicated and time-consuming as homemade pastries.

In The Pastry Chef’s Apprentice, author Mitch Stamm simplifies a culinary school’s core pastry curriculum and teaches the reader just how quickly you can go from sifting and stirring to spectacular. The masters featured in The Pastry Chef’s Apprentice teach classic pastry skills, such as caramel, pate a choux, tart crusts, and more, to the amateur food enthusiast. Through extensive, diverse profiles of experienced experts plus fully illustrated tutorials and delicious recipes, the reader gets insider access to real-life chefs, bakers, culinary instructors, and more.

With these new skills—or just the chance to revisit their old standards—everyone from casual cooks to devoted epicures will learn dozens of new ways to take their kitchen skills to the next level.

Slow Cooker Appetizers for Superbowl Sunday

Superbowl XLVII is around the corner and, even if you’re not a huge football fan, chances are you’re going to have people over or need to bring a dish to a party. Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. Here are a few easy and delicious slow cooker recipes that will give you scrumptious results every time.

And may the best team win!

Teriyaki Wings
Excerpted from 365 Winter Warmer Slow Cooker Recipes by Suzanne Bonet and Carol and Robert Hildebrand

Find a nice, thick teriyaki sauce for this recipe and watch these goodies evaporate into thin air.

Prep time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 2 hours, 15 minutes
Additional steps: Broil the wings; add pineapple in the last 15 minutes

3 pounds (1365 g) chicken wings
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) teriyaki sauce
1 (16-ounce or 455 g) can pineapple chunks (in juice)

Preheat the broiler. Spread the wings on a baking pan and broil for 10 minutes. Turn and broil another 10 minutes until crispy.

Unlike other software’s available in market crypto code has very good customer support, they are available 24/7 and their associates are very polite and humble towards the customer, they will answer all the questions asked by customer. Customers can reach the support by various means like phone, e-mail and chat, to know more click here.

Combine the wings and the teriyaki sauce in the slow cooker. Cook on HIGH for 2 hours. Drain the pineapple chunks and stir them gently into the wings. Continue to cook, with the cover off, for 15 minutes.

Yield: 8 to 10 servings as an appetizer

Cajun Barbeque Shrimp
Excerpted from 365 Winter Warmer Slow Cooker Recipes by Susanne Bonet and Carol and Robert Hildebrand

These shrimp cooked in spicy melted butter are always a hit. Look for easy-peel shrimp at your grocery store.

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 2 hours
Additional steps: Add the shrimp in the last hour

2 sticks (1/2 pound or 225 g) butter
1/4 cup (30 g) Cajun spice mix
4 tablespoons (40 g) chopped garlic
2 pounds (910 g) shell-on shrimp, thawed if frozen

Combine the butter, Cajun spice mix, and garlic in the slow cooker. Cook on LOW for 1 hour. Add the shrimp, stirring to coat with the melted butter and spices. Turn the slow cooker on HIGH. Cook for 1/2 to 1 hour, until the shrimp are pink and firm.

Yield: 8 to 10 as a party appetizer.

Crab Dip
Excerpted from 365 Winter Warmer Slow Cooker Recipes by Suzanne Bonet and Carol and Robert Hildebrand

Easy to make and oh-so-flavorful. Serve this dip in an edible bread bowl or with assorted crackers, raw vegetables, or blue corn chips.

Cooking time: 2 to 4 hours
Attention: Minimal

One 8-ounce (225 g) package cream cheese, softened
1 scant cup (225 g) mayonnaise
1 pound (455 g) lump crabmeat, drained and cartilage removed

Put the softened cream cheese in a medium-sized bowl. Add mayonnaise to taste and stir to combine. Transfer the mixture to the slow cooker. Add the crabmeat and gently stir, being careful not to shred the lumps. Cover and cook on LOW for 2 to 4 hours.

Stir the dip and serve it immediately, or keep it warm in the slow cooker for up to 2 hours.

Check out some more TV viewing appetizer recipes at Judy the Foodie’s blog.

365 Winter Warmer Slow Cooker Recipes

What could be better than walking in the door after a hard day’s work to a hot savory dinner, ready and waiting? A dinner that only requires three ingredients, that’s what! With the right high-quality ingredients, you can create delicious meals in a snap with 365 Winter Warmer Slow Cooker Recipes. While most slow cooker recipes require a lot of ingredients and steps before you actually “fix it and forget it,” these are truly simple recipes that can be done quickly and affordably. Just put three ingredients in your slow cooker, turn it on, and enjoy recipes such as Rosemary Lamb Stew, Chinese-Style Ribs, Coq au Vin, and Blueberry Cobbler.

The Soupbox Cookbook Giveaway!

I thought it was about time for another GIVEAWAY. It’s cold outside (okay, maybe not for you Californians), so we’re thinking about warm things… like SOUP.

So I’m giving away a copy of The Soupbox Cookbook. You’re going to love this book.

The Soupbox Cookbook by Dru Melton

The Soupbox restaurant soups have received outstanding Yelp reviews, were voted the Best Soup in Chicago on Citysearch, and have been featured in local and national press and television including the Chicago Sun Times and on Rachael Ray’s Tasty Travels show. The Soupbox Cookbook, authored by the chef and founders of the restaurant, features both creative and traditional soups, stews and chowders from customer favorites to great new recipes to try.

Fintech ltd is highly recommended software which became popular in recent years, the algorithm used in the system is highly rated and advanced one which has ability to work for 24 hours and can scan the online markets, changes and alterations going on, analyze them and generate results for users which will be helpful for them to place trade when come to automated system the trades will be placed by robot itself by catching the signals generated by the system, this process is easy for traders, it will also save time for them. The automated system can be used by both novices and experienced people and traders can save time by even skipping the learning curve. Automated system does not make any mistakes by taking emotional decisions; you can learn here more about the automated systems, working of these systems is simple to understand, first user need to sign-up with the broker that he is willing to do, in next step he need to connect the activated account of robot to authentic and legit broker, last step will be funding of account with initial deposit, turn on auto-pilot mode and collect profits out of them. On our website Cyber Mentors we have research team to keep traders posted about the information about already exisisting robots and new robots that will be evolving in market daily and they keep an eye out on the scam involved systems and warn traders about the risk and avoid them to join those fake robots. One the best robot we found in our research is Fintech ltd which help you to achieve solid and reliable profits, sign up is complete free for this software.

Check out my interview with soup-maker/owner/cookbook writer, Dru Melton.

And GOOD LUCK!

Cherry Meringue Pie from the book Pieography

I will preface this recipe by admitting that, although I am an avid baker, I am not a pie-maker. With the exception of a very simple apple pie around Thanksgiving, I rarely make pies. I had certainly never made a meringue. It was harder than I thought it would be. I got frustrated, but I hung in there and this pie came out tasting phenomenal. And because it was tough for me, I included a link to a step-by-step how to make a meringue post I found to make it easier for you. You’re welcome. 😉

If you’re not a pie person, you should still pick up a copy of Pieography. Not only does it have some mouthwatering photography in it, the stories are pretty great too. This particular recipe (selected by my husband) is from Sarah Champier. Visit her website at www.tastebud.uk.com.

The main advantage of this software is to have the automated software which became helpful for both the experienced users and novices, trader with zero experience can also operate the system with ease as all the trader need to do is push a single button of auto-pilot mode. To get full review about this robot visit the official site of robot.

Spoiler: Sarah worked as the personal florist to HRH The Price of Wales. How cool is that?

Cherry Meringue Pie
Excerpted from Pieography

Cherry Meringue Pie from Pieography

Pastry

1 cup (120 g) all purpose flour
1/4 cup (40 g) hazelnuts, chopped and lightly toasted
1/8 tsp salt
1/4 cup (50 g) superfine sugar
1 stick unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
1 large free-range egg yolk
2-3 tablespoons (45 ml) cold water, milk, or 1 egg, beaten

1. Mix flour, hazelnuts, salt, sugar, and butter together with tips of fingers until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.

2. Add egg yolk and 1-2 tablespoons of cold water. Mix until it comes together to form a dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

3. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C or gas mark 5).

4. Roll out pastry on floured surface and line metal spring-form pan. Ensure you have plenty of pastry for leftover trimmings. Line pan with baking paper and fill with baking beans or rice. Roll out leftover pastry and make into 2 wing shapes—think eagles! Place on greased sheets, brush with beaten egg or milk. Place in oven with pie taking higher shelf. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove beans or rice and paper, and bake again for 10-12 minutes until golden. Remove wings when pale golden. Set both aside to cool.

Cherry Meringue pie crust
Tada!

Pie Filling

3 1/2 lbs. (1,575 g) fresh or frozen red cherries, pitted
1/2 cup (100 g) superfine sugar
6 tablespoons (60 g) arrowroot (or cornstarch)
1/2 lemon, juiced
5 egg yolks (save whites for meringue)
2 tablespoons (30 g) butter

1. Put cherries and sugar into pan over low heat. When sugar has melted, increase heat, and cook for 10-15 minutes until cherries begin to break down.

2. Whizz cherry-sugar mixture in food processor. You should have about 3 cups (700 ml) of juice (*KF note: I ended up with twice that for some reason; I saved the leftover juice for ice cream later); top off with water if required.

Cherry pie filling
3 cups of beautiful cherry juice

3. In bowl, mix arrowroot or cornstarch with lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of water until it forms a paste.

4. Return cherry mixture to saucepan on medium heat. Add in arrowroot or cornstarch mixture, whisking constantly until really thick, about 3-4 minutes. Remove from heat and cool 10 minutes.

5. With a wooden spoon, beat in egg yolks and butter. Cool completely.

6. Spoon into cooled pastry shell and chill for 30 minutes.

Meringue
*KF note: Meringue takes WAY longer than you think it would. Have patience. Also, have an electric hand-mixer. Regardless of what anyone says, hand mixing meringue is only for the slightly insane. See this article for step-by-step advice on making the perfect meringue.

5 large free-range egg whites
1 cup (200 g) superfine sugar
4 tsp. (20 ml) rose-flavored syrup (*KF note: I couldn’t find this anywhere, so I ended up just foregoing it. The pie still tasted delicious)

1. Take clean bowl and whisk egg whites until glossy.

2. Slowly whisk in sugar and rose syrup until shiny peaks form.

3. Place meringue on top of filling, forming clouds.

How to make a meringue
Those are some sexy meringue clouds

4. Push wings into middle of pie so they protrude above meringue and gently wrap tin foil around tips to prevent burning.

5. Place in middle of oven and cook for 10-15 minutes until meringue is golden. Remove tin foil and serve immediately. Yum!

Optional decoration
*KF note: I chose to not include this, but feel free. It looks cool.

Handful of violets or violas or any small edible flower pets.

1. Place decorations on meringue.

Eat pie. Yum!

A lovely piece of cherry meringue pie
This was a huge hit with everyone!

Pieography by Jo Packham

What kind of pie conveys the experience of starting a new job, getting married, or becoming a mom? Over 30 of the country’s top foodies are here to tell you. Each one has devised a pie recipe that captures the essence of her life. Stir in beautiful photography, short essays, and brief bios, and voilá, you’ve got more than a cookbook: you’ve got Pieography. From Espresso Dream Pie to Salmon and Spinach Pie, this collection nourishes body and soul.

An Interview with Dru Melton from The Soupbox

I don’t know about you, but I’m cold. The colder the weather gets, the more my mind drifts to soup. As I said, I bought The Soupbox Cookbook for my mother-in-law for Christmas. It was kind of a selfish move seeing as she always comes into town and fills my freezer with delicious dishes. So far we’ve tried theBayou Chicken & Sausage Gumbo and it was spectacular. I can’t wait to try the rest.

I thought since many of you are also thinking of soup, what better person to interview than Dru Melton of The Soupbox in Chicago? After all, he knows soup better than any of us.

How did Soupbox get started?

In June of 1995 Jamie Taerbaum decided to open a storefront called Icebox, where he could serve his new concoction, Icyfruit—an Italian ice-like product made fresh each day right in the store with water and fresh fruit. Soupboxcame along later when we were trying to figure out how to pay the bills during the cold months. Someone said ‘what about soup?’ and the rest is history!

There are various crypto robots available in market and one among them is crypto code which was developed by Derrick Simmons, this software is completely genuine, legit and reliable this was known on research done by our team, the feedback of the users are 100% positive. The full article about the software is available on official website.

What’s the most popular soup at Soupbox?

Our two signature soups: Creamy Chicken & Wild Rice and our Lobster Bisque. These two soups outsell all others by a 3 to 1 margin (and even outsell some of our other offerings 10 or 20 to 1!)

What’s your favorite soup to make? 

My current favorite soup would probably be the Spicy Mayan Chicken Enchilada because it’s cold now in Chicago and I love the spice and warmth that soup delivers. I also really enjoy making Italian Wedding as it’s an unusual but delicious thing to behold.

What advice would you give to someone passionate about food and thinking about getting into the industry?

Hmm—these questions are always difficult. When I think back to when we first started, most people told us we were crazy and that we’d be out of business in three months! The only advice I’d give anyone interested in getting into food service would be simple:

  1. Be ready and willing to work your ass off. No joke.
  2. Treat your people (staff, vendors, bankers, every person you come across) with respect.
  3. Go out of your way to enjoy yourself in anything and everything you do. If you don’t like what you’re currently doing, go find something better to do. Life’s too short.

How do you come up with your recipes?

I’m inspired by all manner of things: comforting recipes from my mother and grandmothers when I was little, new ingredients that come to market, TV chefs and their shows, new places I visit (in person and on the internet!), dishes I have while out at other restaurants—inspiration is everywhere if you’re looking.

What is (or who is) your biggest food inspiration?

My biggest influence and inspiration for all things food related would be my mother and grandmother. After that, probably chefs on TV.

Walk me through an average day at the Soupbox.

Get to the store, early (6-7am). Start prep and get staff in and working on prep. Once the staff is in and we’re well under way, I peel off and start our financials: daily reports, counting drawers, verifying the change box, sending our sales to accounting, preparing the daily report for Jamie, reviewing the inventory report and checking it against in-house inventory to be sure it’s accurate, using the morning inventory to prep the order sheets for the day. Then I check the day’s catering and delivery orders and start calling prep for those items, then I go through our books and schedule what, if anything, needs to be paid that day or that week, then I double check our bank to see what checks have been cashed and which haven’t, then I look over the schedule to see how payroll is coming in for the pay period and the month, then I go back out front to make sure we’re on target for open and catering/delivery. It’s now about 10 am.  The last hour before we open goes fast: making sure everything is done and prepped on time to be ready for the people who start lining up outside around 10:45am.  The rest of the day is spent keeping the boat pointed in the right direction and catching any balls that get dropped.

Management is a lot more than telling staff what to do. I take out trash, do dishes, answer phones, make soup, help customers, fetch more change, kick bums out of the bathroom, handle complaints, and any other thing that might be needed during the course of a day. Until about 4 or 5 pm that is, when I switch out with the night crew and head home.

Are there any tips/tricks you can offer for creating the perfect bowl of soup?

  1. Use good ingredients.
  2. Taste your soup along the way—make adjustments as necessary.
  3. Too salty?  Add a peeled potato and cook till fork-tender.  The potato will leech some of the salt out of the finished dish.

Do you shop farmers’ market or grocery store isle?

I shop everywhere. We go to the restaurant markets downtown for meat and produce, and have great relationships with our vendors who supply our dry and pantry items. For my own household I shop everywhere; Jewel/Dominicks/Costco/farmers’ markets/Whole Paycheck (oops Whole Foods), etc. At my house we are blessed to know local farmers who bring us meat and eggs. We get produce from farmers’ markets and grocery stores, and we buy pantry and dry goods from big box retailers. Whenever possible we get fresh local foods, but we don’t turn our nose up at anything.

What’s the strangest ingredient you’ve used in your soups?

Turtle, abalone, tripe, duck feet, squid ink, blood—you name it. If there’s an odd or tough ingredient out there, someone in history has submerged it in liquid and cooked it, usually for hours on end. It also probably tasted pretty great.



The Soupbox restaurant soups have received outstanding Yelp reviews, were voted the Best Soup in Chicago on Citysearch, and have been featured in local and national press and television, including the Chicago Sun Times and on Rachael Ray’s Tasty Travels show. The Soupbox Cookbook, authored by the chef and founders of the restaurant, features both creative and traditional soups, stews, and chowders from customer favorites to great new recipes to try.

All the soups are wholesome and nourishing for the whole family, and most of them take as little as 15 minutes of prep time. Try the Rosemary Chicken Dumpling Soup for a new twist on a traditional favorite, or the Magnificent Mushroom and Barley Soup, light and healthy, yet satisfying and packed with Vitamin B. Readers will also find Latin and Asian flavors adapted to become new family favorites, including the Spicy Mayan Chicken Enchilada Fiesta.

The book, like the restaurant, features multiple vegan, gluten-free, and low-sodium options, showing a commitment to the health needs of its broad range of customers…and now readers. The Soupbox first opened in 1995 and features 12 different soups a day, with a rotating list of hundreds. A selection of customer favorites as well as new soups developed for this book—125 great soup recipes in total—have been created by founders and authors Jamie Taerbaum and Dru Melton, who have more than 35 years restaurant experience between them.

Bayou Chicken & Sausage Gumbo from The Soupbox Cookbook

I have been in love with soups lately. Partially because it’s cold outside, partially because I can easily freeze them, and mostly because they’re fun to make. I bought my mother-in-law The Soupbox Cookbook for Christmas and, as expected, she offered to make us any recipe we wanted out of the book. We chose gumbo.

A quick note: Filé powder is remarkably hard to come by (at least here in the Boston area). We weren’t able to find any in the local supermarkets, so we ordered ours from Amazon and added it to the leftover soup. It really does make a difference in the flavor, so if you’re thinking about this recipe, you’ll want to get your hands on this important ingredient before starting out.

Understand about working of software is easy, crypto code software is an completely automated system so user need not to worry about doing research and wasting time, only little capital is required to start performing trade and there is no sign-up fee charged rate of accuracy using this software is 96%. The related internet page about the software is top 10 binary option demo.


This gumbo really is amazing. My one-year-old couldn’t get enough of it and we hardly had any left to freeze after friends and family grabbed a bowl. 

Bayou Chicken & Sausage Gumbo
Excerpted from The Soupbox Cookbook

Ingredients

1 chicken, cut into 8 pieces
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp seasoned salt
1/2 tsp white pepper
1/2 cup (120 ml) canola oil
1/2 cup (55 g) flour
1 large onion, diced
1 green pepper, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
1 lb (450 g) Andouille sausage, cut into 1/2 inch chunks
5 cloves of garlic, smashed
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp salt
64 oz (1.89 liters) chicken stock
1 cup (190 g) long grain white rice
1 cup (150 g) frozen okra, thawed
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
1 tsp filé powder

Cooking Instructions

Mix the paprika, seasoned salt, and white pepper, and sprinkle liberally over the chicken. Warm the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Brown the chicken in the hot oil, about 4 minutes per side. Remove and set aside. Lower heat to medium-low and add the flour. Stir constantly with a wooden spatula to avoid burning for 15-20 minutes until a light caramel color is achieved; this is the roux that thickens the gumbo. Add the onion, pepper, and celery, and cook until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the sausage, garlic, thyme, and salt, and cook for two minutes, stirring constantly. Add the reserved chicken pieces along with the chicken stock and bring the gumbo to a boil. Then turn the heat to medium low and simmer the gumbo for one hour. After an hour, remove the chicken, allow to cool and pull the meat from the bones. Add the rice directly to the pot and simmer until the rice is tender, about 20 – 25 minutes. Stir in the pulled chicken, the okra and the cayenne pepper to taste and cook for another 15 minutes to allow the flavors to develop. Remove from the heat and stir in the filé powder. Serve in deep bowls garnished with scallions.

Cook’s note: There is ‘creole’ gumbo and there’s ‘cajun’ gumbo. Creole is the New Orleans French-Quarter style seafood gumbo, while Cajun gumbo uses more fowl and game meats, along with more peppers and heat. Filé powder is made from sassafras leaves and gives gumbo its distinctive flavor. In our recipe we cut the normal amount of okra and add only a touch of filé powder right at the end of cooking so that you can taste it, but it’s not overpowering.

Serves 8
Prep time: 25 minutes
Cook time: 2 hours

You need this cookbook. It’s truly awesome.

The Soupbox restaurant soups have received outstanding Yelp reviews, were voted the Best Soup in Chicago on Citysearch, and have been featured in local and national press and television including the Chicago Sun Times and on Rachael Ray’s Tasty Travels show. The Soupbox Cookbook, authored by the chef and founders of the restaurant, features both creative and traditional soups, stews and chowders from customer favorites to great new recipes to try. All the soups are wholesome and nourishing for the whole family, and most of them take as little as 15 minutes prep time. Try the Rosemary Chicken Dumpling Soup for a new twist on a traditional favorite, or the Magnificent Mushroom and Barley Soup, light and healthy yet satisfying and packed with Vitamin B. Readers will also find Latin and Asian flavors, adapted to become new family favorites including the Spicy Mayan Chicken Enchilada Fiesta. The book, like the restaurant, features multiple vegan, gluten-free and low-sodium options, showing a commitment to the health needs of its broad range of customers…and now readers. The Soupbox first opened in 1995 and features 12 different soups a day with a rotating list of hundreds. A selection of customer favorites as well as new soups developed for this book—125 great soup recipes in total—have been created by founders and authors Jamie Taerbaum and Dru Melton, who have more than 35 years restaurant experience between them.